SmartGrid Seminar: Saurabh Amin, Resiliency-Aware Resource Allocation and Dispatch

Thursday, November 16, 2017

1:30 pm

Y2E2 111

Sponsored by:
SLAC NATIONAL ACCELERATOR LABORATORY, PRECOURT INSTITUTE FOR ENERGY, TOMKAT CENTER FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY, ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT AFFILIATES PROGRAM, DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING, DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Abstract: Power systems security is typically approached using the Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow (SCOPF) problem. An SCOPF algorithm changes the system controls to minimize the operation cost while removing contingencies and operating violations. However, standard SCOPF formulations do not consider contingencies resulting from strategic cyber-physical failures, especially the ones resulting from attacks to SCADA systems that operate distribution networks. In this talk, we present a multi-level optimization formulation which enables modeling of worst-case targeted attacks such as mass disconnects or issuance of invalid commands to remotely controllable loads / generation sources. On one hand, the formulation can be used to assess the effectiveness of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) in proactively responding to an attack-induced contingency. On the other hand, it allows for system controls that range from DER dispatch to controlled load shedding to micro-grid formation for clearing the contingency. Our solution approach relies on reformulating the original problem as a bi-level mixed integer problem and solving it using an extended decomposition technique. The results lead to new insights on resiliency-improving operations in radial distribution networks.

Bio: Saurabh Amin is Robert N. Noyce Career Development Associate Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). His research focuses on the design and implementation of high confidence network control algorithms for infrastructure systems. He works on robust diagnostics and control problems that involve using networked systems to facilitate the monitoring and control of critical infrastructures. He also studies the effect of security attacks and random faults on the survivability of networked systems, and designs incentive-compatible control mechanisms to reduce network risks. Dr. Amin received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in 2011. His research is supported by NSF CPS FORCES project, NSF CAREER award, Google Faculty Research award, and Siebel Energy Institute Grant.

When:
Thursday, November 16, 2017
1:30 pm – 2:30 pm
Where:
Y2E2 111
Admission:

Open to all Stanford students, faculty and staff.

Tags:

Lecture / Reading Environment Engineering Science 

Audience:
General Public, Faculty/Staff, Students, Alumni/Friends, Members
Contact:
yutingji@stanford.edu