ESS Ph.D. Dissertation Defense - Taylor Martin: Stable Isotopes of Nitrite as a Tool for Understanding Nitrogen Cycling and Loss in Marine Oxygen Deficient Zones

Thursday, May 31, 2018

2:00 pm

Room 365, Green Earth Sciences Building, 367 Panama Street, Stanford

Sponsored by:
Department of Earth System Science

This talk comprises the public portion of the PhD dissertation defense from approximately 2:00-3:00 PM.

Department: Earth System Science

Graduate Student: Taylor Martin

Advisor: Dr. Karen Casciotti

Title: Stable Isotopes of Nitrite as a Tool for Understanding Nitrogen Cycling and Loss in Marine Oxygen Deficient Zones

Abstract: Nitrogen (N), a key nutrient in the global ocean, has a complicated biogeochemical cycle. In the ocean, nitrogen is mainly found as nitrate (NO3-), but it also accumulates as nitrite (NO2-) within oxygen deficient zones (ODZs). Nitrite is a key intermediate in several processes that produce nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. Using natural abundance stable isotope measurements of NO3- and NO2- help to capture an integrated signal of the N cycle processes. My doctoral work aims to use stable isotopes of N and oxygen (O) in order to further our understanding of the pathways that produce and consume NO2-, which will help us better predict the global impacts of nitrogen cycling both at present and in the future. Many N cycle processes are microbially mediated and impart one or more unique isotope effects on its N substrates and products, and it is important to quantify these isotope effects in order to use numerical models to elucidate relative contributions of different N cycle processes. In Chapter 1, I use pure culture experiments to better constrain estimates of the N and O isotope effects of microbial nitrite reduction, a key step in the process of denitrification, which leads to loss of bioavailable N. I then use the values from this experiment, in conjunction with previous estimates of other N cycle process isotope effects, to model observed NO3- and NO2- data from the Arabian Sea (Chapter 2) and explore the necessity for oxygen-requiring processes within the ODZ. In Chapter 3, I expand upon the results from previous chapters by applying the results to a global 3D inverse model of the N cycle, which includes isotopic fractionation, in order to examine the NO2- production and consumption processes within marine ODZs. I also examine the sensitivity of NO3- and NO2- concentration and isotope profiles to controlling parameters of N cycle processes, such as oxygen thresholds and isotope effects, in order to examine the roles of individual processes in N loss, and their potential for future change.

When:
Thursday, May 31, 2018
2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Where:
Room 365, Green Earth Sciences Building, 367 Panama Street, Stanford
Tags:

PhD Oral Environment Science 

Audience:
Faculty/Staff, Students, Alumni/Friends
Contact:
(650) 721-5723, ktewks@stanford.edu