Reading Minds: Lie Detection, Neuroscience, Law, and Society

A revolution in neuroscience has vastly expanded our understanding of the human brain and its operations. Our increasing ability to monitor the brain's operations holds the possibility of being able to detect directly a person's mental state. One of the most interesting possible applications is using neuroscientific methods to provide reliable lie detection. Several scientists, and several companies, claim that this use has arrived. The morning session of the conference will examine the scientific plausibility of reliable lie detection through neuroscientific methods, discussing different methods and assessing their likely success. The afternoon session will assume that at least one of those methods is established as reliable and will then explore what social and legal ramifications will follow. This conference is free and open to the public but advance registration is required.

 
Date and Time:
 Friday, March 10, 2006.  8:30 AM.
Approximate duration of 8 hour(s).
Location:
Stanford Law School Room 190  [Map]
URL:
Audience:
Faculty/Staff
Alumni/Friends
General Public
Students
Members
Category:
Conferences/Symposia
Sponsor:
The Stanford Center for Law and the Biosciences, part of the Stanford Program in Law, Science & Technology
Contact:
(650) 723-5905
tech@law.stanford.edu
Admission:
Free
Download:
Print:
Last Modified:
February 27, 2006