Jennifer Rosner discusses her journey into the modern world of deafness

Jennifer Rosner explores family, silence, and what it means to be heard. When her daughters are born deaf, Rosner is stunned. Then, she discovered a hidden history of deafness in her family, going back generations to the Jewish enclaves of Eastern Europe. Rosner shares her journey into the modern world of deafness, and the controversial decisions she and her husband have made about hearing aids, cochlear implants and sign language.  Rosner's story of her daughters' deafness is at heart a story of whether she – a mother with perfect hearing – will hear her children.

Rosner holds a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Stanford, and is editor of The Messy Self (Paradigm Publishers, 2007). She returns to speak not as a philosopher, but as a mother who faced many controversial decisions in raising her two deaf daughters.

Jennifer Rosner
 

When:
Thursday, September 30, 2010. 5:00 PM.
Approximate duration of 1.5 hour(s).
Where:
Beckman Center, Munzer Hall (Map)
Audience:
Faculty/Staff
Alumni/Friends
General Public
Students
Members
Tags:
Lecture / Reading
Humanities
Sponsor:
Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and the McCoy Family Center for Ethics in Society
Contact:
Admission:

Free and open to the public.