Governance in the Emerging World: China

Monday, October 29, 2018

3:30 pm

Hauck Auditorium, David & Joan Traitel Building, Hoover Institution Map

Sponsored by:
Hoover Institution

George P Shultz's project of Governance in an Emerging New World explores the challenges and opportunities for our democracy, our economy, and our security posed by emerging technologies and societal changes.

New and rapid societal and technological changes are complicating governance around the globe and challenging traditional thinking. Demographic changes and migration are having a profound effect as some populations age and shrink while other countries expand. The information and communications revolution is making governance much more difficult and heightening the impact of diversity. Emerging technologies, especially artificial intelligence and automation, are bringing about a new industrial revolution, disrupting workforces and increasing military capabilities of both states and non-state actors. And new means of production such as additive manufacturing and automation are changing how, where, and what we produce. These changes are coming quickly, faster than governments have historically been able to respond.

Led by Hoover Distinguished Fellow George P Shultz, his Project on Governance in an Emerging New World aims to understand these changes and inform strategies that both address the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities afforded by these dramatic shifts.

The project will feature a series of papers and events addressing how these changes are affecting democratic processes, the economy, and national security of the United States, and how they are affecting countries and regions, including Russia, China, Europe, Africa, and Latin America. A set of essays by the participants will accompany each event and provide thoughtful analysis of the challenges and opportunities.

October 29, 2018, 3:30–5:00 pm: China in an Emerging World

Even as its economy continues to grow, and it becomes a world leader in technology, China must also contend with an aging, unbalanced population and the information revolution. The discussion will examine China’s pursuit of next-generation technologies for economic, political, and military purposes as well as its changing demographics and widespread use—both by individuals and the government—of new means of communications.

Moderated by Admiral Gary Roughead (USN, ret.), Hoover Institution

Panelists:

- Nicholas Eberstadt, American Enterprise Institute

- Elsa Kania, Center for a New American Security

- Kai-Fu Lee, Sinovation Ventures

- Maria Repnikova, Georgia State University

- Stapleton Roy, former US ambassador to China

When:
Monday, October 29, 2018
3:30 pm – 5:00 pm
Where:
Hauck Auditorium, David & Joan Traitel Building, Hoover Institution Map
Admission:

Eventbrite Invitation Link

Tags:

Education Seminar 

Audience:
Faculty/Staff, Students, Members
Contact:
hooverevents@stanford.edu
More info:
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